The memo we wouldn’t forget: Memorandum Circular 1

Apart from being the first official act by the Aquino administration, Memorandum Circular No. 1 (MC No. 1) would be remembered for causing confusion in the bureaucracy on President Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino’s first full working day. For some, it would also be remembered as Aquino’s first “official blooper.”
Just a few hours after Aquino took his oath as chief executive on June 30, Presidential spokesman Edwin Lacierda announced in a press conference that Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa issued MC No. 1 declaring all non-career executive service positions (non-CESO) vacant as of June 30, 2010 and extending the services of contractual employees whose contract expire on June 30, 2010 up to July 31, 2010.

The memo sought to “prevent the unnecessary disruption of government operations, and the impairment of all official processes as well as the delivery of services to the people.”

The following day, Palace officials took back the circular and reissued on the same day after causing confusion among the ranks of government workers.

“We received a lot of texts raising concerns on their status that’s why we had to fine-tune its language,” Lacierda said in a GMANews.tv report. “There was uncertainty as to the status of a number of non-career personnel so that had to be clarified.”

Inquirer.net reported the content of the revised MC 1 as follows:

“All presidential appointees under coterminous status and/or those occupying positions created in excess of the authorized staffing pattern in all departments, offices, agencies and bureaus in the executive branch, are deemed separated from the service as of noon of June 30.

All non-career executive service officials (non-CESO) occupying career executive service (CES) positions in all agencies of the executive branch shall remain in office and continue to perform their duties and discharge their responsibilities until July 31, or until their resignations have been accepted and/or until their respective replacements have been appointed or designated, whichever comes first.

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